She made her choice and paid the price.

Name: Corrie Mackenzie
Age: 16
Origin: Australia

Corrie is an Australian teenager living on a sheep farm outside Wirrawee. She’s Ellie’s best friend and her pillar of strength. They have spent their childhood together and often went camping to the river. Nothing much is known about her as she is tragically taken away from the group when a soldier shoots her in the back. Her death affects Ellie to the point that she writes several pages about her memories with Corrie in Darkness Be My Friend, considered by the many fans of the books as the most moving and emotional moment in the whole series.

Corrie is determined, brave, gentle and loving. Unlike Ellie, she’s much more forgiving (“Corrie was much more forgiving than me. More tolerant.” Tomorrow, When The War Began, Chapter 5). Her relationship with Kevin had a huge impact on her life as she gained confidence in herself (“I could see the way she started getting so much more confident from going with him, and I liked that.” Tomorrow, When The War Began, Chapter 1).

When asked by Homer what they should do she’s the first who states her intentions: fight for her friends, for her family, for her country. She didn’t let her fears stop her. And she paid the price.

Corrie’s determination…

“I smiled. A lot of people underestimated Corrie. She just quietly worked away on people till she got what she wanted.” (Tomorrow, When The War Began, Chapter 5)

Corrie and Ellie…

“Corrie and I were probably the most ener­getic. We took a few walks, back to the bridge, or to different cliffs, so we could have long private conversa­tions. We talked about boys and friends and school and parents, all the usual stuff. We decided that when we left school we’d earn some money for six months and then go overseas together. We got really excited about it.” (Tomorrow, When The War Began, Chapter 5)

Corrie’s kindness…

“Corrie had this idea that she’d have a look at everything, come home, do nursing, then go back and work in the country that needed nurses most. I admired her for that. I was more interested in making money.” (Tomorrow, When The War Began, Chapter 5)

Corrie’s cleverness…

‘We don’t have all that much time. The main thing’s to be careful. If we can’t see anything then we just go back to Robyn’s. If there’s anyone there the dumbest thing we could do would be to have them see us and come after us.’ (Tomorrow, When The War Began, Chapter 7)

Corrie’s innocence…

“‘Ellie, I just can’t believe this is happening. Invasions only happen in other countries, and on TV. Even if we survive this I know I’ll never feel safe again.’” (Tomorrow, When The War Began, Chapter 9)

Corrie’s tragic death…

“Her face looked so calm, but I felt that there was a terrible war being waged inside her body, a fight to the death.” (Tomorrow, When The War Began, Chapter 22)

“There she was; her soft skin, her plump face, her closed eyes. My own mouth was slightly open, in wonder, because she looked so different to the Corrie of my past friendship, and the Corrie of my fearful imaginings. She did not look gaunt and battered and bruised, but neither did she look happy and lively and talkative. She looked like a wax doll, a fully formed impression of Corrie. I could see her lips move slightly with each breath in and breath out but there was no other movement. She was alive, yet somehow not with us any more.” (The Dead Of The Night, Chapter 3)

In memory of Corrie…

“And now my best mate was under the earth, under six feet of cold heavy soil, separated from me by six feet and by eternity. How could it be possible? All those futures we discussed, all those plans to share a flat and go to uni, to travel the world together, to get jobs as pilots or jillaroos or teachers or doctors or governesses: in none of those plans did we ever consider for a moment that it might end like this. Death wasn’t on our agenda. We never mentioned the word. We thought we were indestructible. And what would happen to me now? Our plans had always been for two, but Corrie had left me and I was on my own. I felt like a Siamese twin who’d been amputated from her other half. Sure I had Fi, and sure I loved her dearly, but I hadn’t grown up with her the way I had with Corrie.” (Darkness Be My friend, Chapter 16)